16 Smokey Eye Hacks, Tips and Tricks For The Sexiest Makeup Look Ever

The smokey eye just may be the sexiest eye makeup look I can think of. It’s nice to have neat, perfectly applied eye shadow, but there is something to be said for that smudgey look you get from a good smokey eye. When it’s done right, it can make you look like you’ve been out having all kinds of exciting adventures – and who doesn’t want to look like that? Sometimes, messy is just better (same principle applies to beach waves).

I remember when I first mastered the smokey eye. It happened when I bought a Maybelline palette containing three shades of blue shadow, along with one white one. The palette explained exactly where to apply the different colors. After years of sporting a blue smokey eye (embarrassing), I learned that I could apply these basics to any color. I do a variation of the smokey eye look almost every single day. Once you get it down, it’s easy!

But the smokey eye can be a little intimidating if you’ve never done it. I get it. I was scared of black shadow at first, too (hence why I used blue for so long). That’s why these tutorials are so helpful. Here are 16 smokey eye hacks, tips and tricks you need to know to get the sexiest makeup look ever. 

 

1. Here is a basic smokey eye tutorial you can apply to any color scheme: 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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2. You can also use this simple diagram for any color scheme on how to create a smokey look: 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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3. Or, simply draw these lines and blend for an easy, smudged look. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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4. Learn the best ways to apply eye shadow for your eye type. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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5. These are the four types of brushes you’ll need for perfect application: 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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6. Don’t forget to smudge liner under your eye as well. That gives you a very dramatic look that’s great for nighttime. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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7. A secret tip that can change your look? Use a clean brush to blend instead of one with shadow on it. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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8. Create a winged shadow look to make your smokey eye more intense. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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9. This illustration of smokey eye basics is definitely worth reading: 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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10. You don’t have to stick to a black smokey eye. You can also do gold: 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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11. Or metallic… 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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12. …Or something colorful… 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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13. …Or something more natural and daytime appropriate. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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14. You can also create a smokey eye using only eyeliner. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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15. …Or only a kohl pencil. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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16. You can pick products based on your skin tone. 

smokey eye tips tutorials

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Which of these tips did you find the most helpful? Are you a fan of the smokey eye? How do you do yours? What kind of beauty tips do you want to see? Tell me in the comments!

 

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  • miranda

    former pro makeup artist here… first, it’s “smoky”. “smokey” is a bear and Chris Tucker’s character from “Friday”. it may be nitpicky, but it annoys me to no end that this misspelling continues to be propogated (i’ve even seen it in major publications, and from actual paid, professional artists).

    grammar lesson aside….

    a true smoky eye has an almost circular shape, is darkest at the lashlines (top and bottom), gradually fades upward on the top lid, downward under the lower lashes, and can be any color — it’s a technique/product placement/”shape”, not limited to black/grey/brown.

    when the darkest color/concentration of color is focused on the outer corner or crease, that’s not a smoky eye. when the lower lashline is a harsh line and not smudged softly downward, it’s not a smoky eye. if the color is evenly, solidly applied to the entire lid, it’s not a smoky eye. if the color is significantly lighter on the inner half/third of the eye, it’s not a smoky eye. if there are hard edges anywhere, it’s not a smoky eye. #6 and #10 come closest from these examples, but the rest — while good tutorials for various applications — are simply not smoky eye applications (#8 is just a very intense cat-eye).

    the smoky eye is thought to have originated with flappers in the 1920s, who lined their eyes with kohl powder (in some instances, a combination of soot and goose grease), sometimes with petroleum jelly. this would gradually smudge and fade out into a mostly circular ring around their eyes, darkest at the lashlines.

    although the lighting washes out her left eye (on the veiwer’s right), this picture is a good example of a true smoky eye – look at her right eye (viewer’s left) – circular, darkest at lashline, fading upward and downward, and encircling almost the entire eye:

    http://www.bluevelvetvintage.com/vintage_style_files/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/clarabow2.jpg

    another good one:
    http://media-cache-cd0.pinimg.com/236x/f6/fc/ae/f6fcaef544279fcc5598430670f423f2.jpg

    clara bow. josephine baker. lousie brooks. GOOGLE for great examples of true smoky eyes 🙂