7 Horrible Things You Learned From Beauty And The Beast

Beauty And The Beast is my all-time favorite Disney movie ever. I always related the most to Belle because she was smart and loved books and was a little bit weird, like myself. Belle didn’t have a problem with being odd and always stayed true to herself, which I loved so much about her.

She also made a lot of sacrifices for the sake of her family. I love my family and would like to think that I’d make the same kind of sacrifices for them. Even though Beauty And The Beast is thrilling and enchanting, looking at it as an adult is kind of scary.

Here are 7 things from Beauty And The Beast that are just not okay:

 
What do you think about Beauty And The Beast? Can you think of anything else wrong with the movie? Tell us in the comments!
 

Check out these 8 lessons you need to unlearn from Cinderella

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21 Comments

  1. avatar Ana says:

    We all should look at this, then reevaluate our views on this movie, and after it is read, THEN we can argue about the “bad lessons” in this movie, if they seem relevant at all after reading this post.
    http://iwastesomuchtime.com/on/?i=87090
    Don’t let the website’s name fool you, this post really gives you something to think about.

  2. avatar Liz says:

    Belle does not have Stockholm syndrome. I’m so tired of people saying that. She wasn’t captured or kidnapped, she went in her fathers place instead.

  3. avatar Ana says:

    Yes, the beastiality thing is weird, but we have it remember he’s not LITERALLY an animal, he was transformed into one, put under a curse, which isn’t the same thing. And talking inanimate objects was just a side effect of the curse. And are we really sure Belle gave up her dream of quests? She could have gone on quests outside of the time of the movie.

  4. avatar Dell says:

    It’s not lying if you don’t say anything -.-

  5. avatar erin says:

    Do Snow White!

  6. avatar Vitaloni says:

    This is a very poorly written article.
    Also, this is a movie meant for enjoyment purposes.
    The last thing I’m thinking about when I’m watching a princess movie is any of the above things listed in this. Kind of immature, really. At the least this movie is a good example (Not judging a book by its cover, loving someone for whats inside, not being too vain, etc.)
    Seeing these articles make it pretty hard for me to take this website seriously, to be honest.

  7. avatar Becca says:

    wrong. He wasn’t a teenager.
    “Ten years had past” was in Be Our Guest and then there’s the mention that he has till 21 to find true love.
    He was 11 when he was cursed.
    He was child. Not even a teenager, pre-teen at best.

  8. avatar violet7789 says:

    one of the things I really like about these disney posts are the discussions they bring out, these are some college level discussions that could make great papers, like jhamje and shelby’s comment above. plus i majored in women and gender studies, so these are the types of things we’d discuss. I always loved relating topics from class to parts of pop culture, like disney, or my little pony, or children’s books in general (once we analyzed hundreds of award winning children’s books from different decades to see how they compared and how they were affected by the era).

  9. avatar DaynaMarie says:

    I can rant about how wrong this article is for several paragraphs, but I’ll just stick with slide 4 as it bothers me the most and I haven’t seen a correction for it yet.

    Direct movie quote: “Repulsed by her haggard appearance, the prince sneered at the gift and turned the old woman away. But she warned him not to be deceived by appearances, for beauty is found within.”

    The whole point of the curse it to punish the prince for judging people based on outside appearance and he must find someone who loves him even when he does look like a beast. Telling Belle that he is really a handsome prince completely goes against this. If Belle were to fall in love with him based on the fact that underneath his beastly exterior he was human and attractive, she wouldn’t have proven that she loved him for what was inside his heart and mind.

  10. avatar Lee says:

    OMG! I did an analysis of this movie last June. With the SAME EXACT POINT. HA! I knew i wasn’t exaggerating! !!!!

  11. avatar Ashley James says:

    Disney may have given wonderful memories but also exposed us to horrible villains made to look cool like these

    http://bit.ly/IHateDisney

  12. avatar Haley says:

    Can we all just stop over-analyzing childhood movies? That’s the annoying thing about adults–they find all these problems in childhood entertainment where there are no problems at all. I watched Beauty and the Beast as a kid, and never did I get any of those “lessons” from it. I just enjoyed the movie. You don’t get life lessons from movies.

  13. avatar jhamje says:

    Maurice won’t own up to the fact that it was his decision to go the wrong route and not Phillpe’s. Then Phillipe has the tracking ability to brimng Belle back to the castle.
    Belle breaks her verbal contract with Beast barely less than a day into it.
    The mob is willing to kill Beast based on the evidence provided by a mirror.
    Gaston is a complete lout but wants Belle over a buxom twosome.
    That Beast is so self-centered that he condemns his entire servant staff to the same fate as himself. This fact has zero impact on Belle.
    That Beast is condemned to his fate despite the fact is he only 16 years old. Abuse of a minor.
    Mrs. Potts ignores all of her other cup children in favor of her favorite.
    LaFoo wants to be beaten because he has homoerotic fantasies about Gaston.

  14. avatar Shelby says:

    The problem with this kind of analysis is that it completely disregards the fact that the movie was adapted from a fairy tale. The fairy tale that Disney adapted was written in the 1700s, and back then, the purpose of fairy tales was to prepare kids for the life ahead of them. Now, in eighteenth century Europe, arranged marriages (or marriages that were purely for political/economic reasons) were extremely common. For the most part, the original Beauty and the Beast is basically a story that was supposed to prepare young girls for that type of marriage (one that they didn’t really want – one in which they might marry a figurative “beast” – but had to deal with anyway). However, when Disney adapted it, they weren’t able to take out all of these issues without completely destroying the original story. Consequently, a lot of things that look like “bad lessons” for today’s youths are really just vestiges of the original story. Personally, I think it’s specious at best to apply today’s morals to a story that was written for a completely different time period.

  15. avatar anon says:

    This has to be the dumbest thing I’ve ever read. Beast isn’t an animal. He’s a cursed human, like a werewolf. If he was literally an animal, I think they would have that clear. Her dream was to go on an adventure and she did. He didn’t lie. What was he supposed to say? “Fall in love with me or everyone’s cursed forever. No pressure.” The moral of this story was that appearances can be deceiving. His anger and bitterness was a facade. Admittedly, it’s not the best moral for little girls but I took it for what it was.

  16. avatar Stephanie Borgani says:

    Well, this did have some interesting observations.. but may I just say that we are taught that Disney makes only cartoons, and we don’t need to, necessarily, use its characters as role models. I never did, but I liked Disney because it shows us that magical things can happen if you have a little imagination.. and personally I was devastated reading this article, it destroys the real purpose of fairy-tales :(

  17. avatar Rory236 says:

    Okay, maybe some of the arguments are unnecessarily harsh, but whatever – there is a good point and a good intent in this article. Personally, I never particularly liked Beauty and the Beast, and my reasons were very similar to some that were stated here. Childhood sentimentality aside, I don’t think Beauty is a very good role model for girls and although there are worse fairytales out there, from all the Disney movies I see this one as the most problematic.

  18. avatar Megan says:

    Belle doesn’t give up her dreams for Beast or “some dude”; if she gave them up for anybody, she gave them up for her father so that he could be free and seek the medical treatment he needed to get better since the Beast kept him locked in a tower and no doctors were around. So, number 5 is completely wrong and needs to be taken off the list.

  19. avatar Lissa says:

    Okay. I just wrote a really long comment about how this article is unnessary and somewhat mean, but it got deleted somehow.

    Just saying, I disagree with all your reasons.
    1. We can all see that Beast is not really an animal, but a HUMAN turned into a beast. He wears clothes on all the time, for goodness’s sake!
    2. Okay, so he has anger issues. But he actually manages to control them for Belle.
    4. Belle doesn’t fall in love with him while she’s locked up in a room, she falls in love with him while she actually gets to know him.
    5. BELLE DOESN’T GIVE UP HER DREAMS. She dreamt of adventure, of “magic spells and a prince in disguise”, if I recall her lines correctly. That’s exactly what she got by refusing to marry Gaston and living with the Beast instead.
    6. She flirts with Gaston? Really? She ignores him and even slams a door in his face!
    7. After being kidnapped by a beast, I don’t think the talking objects would be Belle’s biggest concern. Besides, this is a fairytale.

    • avatar anonymous says:

      Yeah! I agree.
      I don’t like that gurl always tries to modernize cartoons and sexualize them.

    • avatar NorthStarSea says:

      You also have to account for the fact that he was literally a teenager when he was transformed! When a creepy old lady turns up at your door and asks for a place to stay, you don’t say, “Yeah, come join the party!”. No. You call the proper authorities. So the control thing could stem from trauma endured during his teens, a very vulnerable age. I love the OUAT version (Once Upon A Time, for those who don’t watch it). SPOILER ALERT: Rumplestiltskin as the beast is awesome.

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