what is too skinny?

is this scary skinny?

A few weeks ago, gURL posted a story called Scary Skinny that attempted to raise awareness of the severe skinny problem that was, in our eyes, rampant at fashion shows.  We included polls on each slide so we could judge what you think is the kind of skinny that makes you scared silly for the gURLs’ health or just the kind of skinny that comes so naturally to many in the industry. In this photo, 84% of you responded that yes, she looks scary skinny.

Our goal was to discourage any gURLs from thinking that this kind of look is attainable or desirable if your body isn’t already naturally this way; our goal was definitely not to make naturally thin gURLs feel bad. Too many gURLs and boys look at images of skinny people (whom, after we witnessed at shows often starve themselves) and think “That’s what I want to look like!” when their bodies may not be built like those who grace the runways. Body dysmorphia, anorexia, bulimia, and cutting ensue — and these diseases and behaviors are often traced to media influence. We wanted to do what we could to ensure that “scary skinny” is not worth losing your health (or anything, really) over. The way you are, right now, is just fine.

Models are naturally slender, and many become models when they’re young, before their bodies have totally hit puberty, so that clothes will fit without curves getting in the way. In an industry where image is so important, we continually question why the image they portray is one that continually denies and excludes women who don’t look like one singular body type.

On the Shout Out Boards, many of you were upset by a staff member’s colloquial reduction of her fear and sadness that came along with some upsetting things she saw at Fashion Week and, for what it’s worth, we’re glad that you reacted. Many of you were angry. Many of you could commiserate. The last thing any gURL staff member was trying to do was make anyone feel bad — owe only wanted to help! Said staffer asked what too skinny is and you had many intelligent, insightful things to say — most importantly, that there isn’t really such a thing. The degree of skinniness, or fatness, or whatever, is entirely a non-issue. Our bodies house our organs, thoughts, desires and dreams. What matters is that we’re good to them.

So let’s continue the conversation below and talk about how media, the fashion industry and models may affect your body image, food choices, or thoughts…

-gURL


Posted in: Gurl News, Health, Sex & Relationships
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  • Shalonda Recek
  • lose weight

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  • S.Hailey!

    the said staffer showed her disgust at how skinny these models were more than ask us "wdyt". that's why she recieved negative replies. personally, i'm not that size as the models shown. i'm 5'0, 110 pounds, and am 20 years old. i'm happy with the way my body is. sure, i could use a tone up, but i'm overall happy. a lot of photos are photoshopped in the media before they are put to publication.

    what gurl staff saw at the show may have been the real deal, but there have and always will be too many stereotypes against "scary skinny" girls. what would you say if their physician told you that they were perfectly healthy? it all has to do with what people are used to seeing. people are against being "scary skinny", but at the same time are against being obese. there's stereotypes on both sides. people will never find a common ground.

    i understand that there are girls who have eating disorders, but, by all means, calling them "scary skinny" isn't going to help. that's what they don't want to be called-scary, ugly, etc. yet, the media portrays girls being "scary skinny" as having an eating disorder more than they do with being healthy. where's the support, the love and affection that these girls so desperately crave? it's not here. no, people look at them and call them scary. shame. when they get bigger, people call them fat. shame.

    it's a lose/lose situation with the media, which is why girls should take charge, empower themselves and be who they are, healthy and all. every body is beautiful and different, and before we judge others we should look at ourselves, because many girls have at least one thing that at one point in their life didn't like about their body. what matters is if one is healthy and happy. that's all we want in life. so, what's the problem?

  • Sarah

    "Said staffer asked what too skinny is and you had many intelligent, insightful things to say — most importantly, that there isn’t really such a thing. The degree of skinniness, or fatness, or whatever, is entirely a non-issue. Our bodies house our organs, thoughts, desires and dreams. What matters is that we’re good to them." I that that is basically true but not in terms of health; If someone is clinically underweight or overweight, I think that they should try to get in better shape if that is possible for them.